Fast Five Quiz: Test Your Knowledge of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Bradley Schwartz, DO

Disclosures

March 09, 2017

LUTS has been commonly referred to as prostatism, although this term has decreased in popularity. These entities overlap; not all men with BPH have LUTS, and likewise, not all men with LUTS have BPH. Approximately half of men diagnosed with histopathologic BPH demonstrate moderate to severe LUTS.

Clinical manifestations of LUTS include urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia (awakening at night to urinate), decreased or intermittent force of stream, or a sensation of incomplete emptying. Complications occur less commonly but may include AUR, impaired bladder emptying, the need for corrective surgery, renal failure, recurrent UTIs, bladder stones, or gross hematuria.

Prostate volume may increase over time in men with BPH. In addition, peak urinary flow, voided volume, and symptoms may worsen over time in men with untreated BPH. The risk for AUR and the need for corrective surgery increases with age.

For more on the background of BPH, read here.

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